PublicAffairs is an independent publishing house focusing on serious non-fiction for general readers. Our mission: to publish good books about things that matter. Our authors include Muhammad Yunus, George Soros, Wendy Kopp, Paul Farmer, Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo, and David Stockman, among many others.

We also publish The Economist's renowned line of business books in North America, and partner with Nation Books, a project of the Nation Institute, to bring you books on current social and political issues.
litrant:

Fur-kids, cat ladies and dog people
Citizen Canine: Our Evolving Relationship With Dogs and Cats by David Grimm (Public Affairs, $26.99).
Any dog—or cat—lover will attest to our belief that our pets are family. But what sort of status should they have under the law? David Grimm, an editor at Science, looks at the changing status of pets in our culture, including instances of custody battles, court-appointed lawyers, and the question of conferring legal “personhood” on animals (which he ultimately rejects).
Citizen Canine provides an intriguing historical overview of the status of pets in society, as well as the major changes in status in the United States, from early indifference to pets as “useless” animals to their current position as “fur kids” in many families.
In addition to a survey, though, Grimm also looks at the various positions of animal rights activists, animal rescue groups, and they ways in which these positions are playing out in our society.
Whether readers are dog people or cat people—or even, perhaps, rodent or reptile people—this comprehensive look at the position of animals in our lives is a worthwhile read.

litrant:

Fur-kids, cat ladies and dog people

Citizen Canine: Our Evolving Relationship With Dogs and Cats by David Grimm (Public Affairs, $26.99).

Any dog—or cat—lover will attest to our belief that our pets are family. But what sort of status should they have under the law? David Grimm, an editor at Science, looks at the changing status of pets in our culture, including instances of custody battles, court-appointed lawyers, and the question of conferring legal “personhood” on animals (which he ultimately rejects).

Citizen Canine provides an intriguing historical overview of the status of pets in society, as well as the major changes in status in the United States, from early indifference to pets as “useless” animals to their current position as “fur kids” in many families.

In addition to a survey, though, Grimm also looks at the various positions of animal rights activists, animal rescue groups, and they ways in which these positions are playing out in our society.

Whether readers are dog people or cat people—or even, perhaps, rodent or reptile people—this comprehensive look at the position of animals in our lives is a worthwhile read.

nprbooks:

The World Cup starts this week! To get in the futbol spirit, author Dave Zirin recommends Eduardo Galeano’s Soccer in Sun and Shadow, which he calls “the most lyrical sports book ever written.” Zirin writes:

In just about 300 pages, [Galeano] attempts nothing less than an exposition of the entire cultural history of soccer. No chapter is more than a few pages; some merit only a paragraph. Yet all are evocative, with words woven to create a mood as thrilling as watching the World Cup in a packed pub.

nprbooks:

The World Cup starts this week! To get in the futbol spirit, author Dave Zirin recommends Eduardo Galeano’s Soccer in Sun and Shadow, which he calls “the most lyrical sports book ever written.” Zirin writes:

In just about 300 pages, [Galeano] attempts nothing less than an exposition of the entire cultural history of soccer. No chapter is more than a few pages; some merit only a paragraph. Yet all are evocative, with words woven to create a mood as thrilling as watching the World Cup in a packed pub.

Father's Day is June 15th! →

heritageradionetwork:

David Sax is an expert of food trends and author of Save the Deli and most recently The Tastemakers: Why We’re Crazy For cupcakes But Fed Up With Fondue. Linda and David talk about how food trends come about, how they spread across the world, and how they come back decades later. Tune in to hear about trends such as Asian BBQ and cupcakes! This program has been sponsored by S. Wallace Edwards & Sons. Today’s music provided by Pamela Royal.
CLICK HERE FOR FULL EPISODE:
"Everything’s so interconnected. We share our food culture now online and in media so much more easily and so much more widespread." [21:45]
—David Sax on A Taste of the Past

heritageradionetwork:

David Sax is an expert of food trends and author of Save the Deli and most recently The Tastemakers: Why We’re Crazy For cupcakes But Fed Up With Fondue. Linda and David talk about how food trends come about, how they spread across the world, and how they come back decades later. Tune in to hear about trends such as Asian BBQ and cupcakes! This program has been sponsored by S. Wallace Edwards & Sons. Today’s music provided by Pamela Royal.

CLICK HERE FOR FULL EPISODE:

"Everything’s so interconnected. We share our food culture now online and in media so much more easily and so much more widespread." [21:45]

—David Sax on A Taste of the Past

litrant:

The second salvation
American Crucifixion: The Murder of Joseph Smith and the Fate of the Mormon Church by Alex Beam (Public Affairs, $26.99).
When Joseph Smith was murdered by a mob at a jail in 1844, it might not have qualified as a literal crucifixion, but it took on that mantle figuratively. These days, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS) is approaching mainstream; then, it was a disturbing threat to the status quo. 
Alex Beam uses a journalist’s precision to make the case that any new religion would have produced that sort of reaction in the U.S. of the time, but that Smith’s new doctrine of polygamy was the final push needed to crystallize persecution of Mormons.
It’s possible to argue—as many historians have—that the LDS were simply the most extreme among many new religious movements of the time (think Adventism and Christian Science, which also have their roots in the period). But he makes a good case for those—also now relatively mainstream—groups also being viewed with suspicion, as well as a good case for the doctrine of polygamy being the match that lit the fuse.

Beam is impartial enough that he’s likely to upset both members of the LDS and their critics, some of whom are only slightly less rabid than the folks in Nauvoo and Carthage; to those of us interested in history, that’s a good indicator of the value of this book.

litrant:

The second salvation

American Crucifixion: The Murder of Joseph Smith and the Fate of the Mormon Church by Alex Beam (Public Affairs, $26.99).

When Joseph Smith was murdered by a mob at a jail in 1844, it might not have qualified as a literal crucifixion, but it took on that mantle figuratively. These days, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS) is approaching mainstream; then, it was a disturbing threat to the status quo.

Alex Beam uses a journalist’s precision to make the case that any new religion would have produced that sort of reaction in the U.S. of the time, but that Smith’s new doctrine of polygamy was the final push needed to crystallize persecution of Mormons.

It’s possible to argue—as many historians have—that the LDS were simply the most extreme among many new religious movements of the time (think Adventism and Christian Science, which also have their roots in the period). But he makes a good case for those—also now relatively mainstream—groups also being viewed with suspicion, as well as a good case for the doctrine of polygamy being the match that lit the fuse.

Beam is impartial enough that he’s likely to upset both members of the LDS and their critics, some of whom are only slightly less rabid than the folks in Nauvoo and Carthage; to those of us interested in history, that’s a good indicator of the value of this book.

BookExpo America attendees, come to our two author signings on Friday, May 30th:
10 AM: Kwasi Kwarteng (home team: England) signs copies of his book War and Gold: A Five-Hundred-Year History of Empires, Adventures, and Debt
3 PM: David Sax (home team: Canada) signs copies of his book The Tastemakers: Why We’re Crazy for Cupcakes but Fed Up With Fondue
Visit us at Booth 1406, where we will declare allegiance to Her Majesty, the Queen!

BookExpo America attendees, come to our two author signings on Friday, May 30th:

Visit us at Booth 1406, where we will declare allegiance to Her Majesty, the Queen!

"If a cronut hits a place, and no one takes a picture, does it really exist?"

Video for The Tastemakers: Why We’re Crazy for Cupcakes but Fed Up with Fondue by David Sax.

"Food trends take commitment, dedication, heart, and the 250 actors that we hire to stand in line outside the restaurant."—Noah, Chef/Tastemaker

Video for The Tastemakers: Why We’re Crazy for Cupcakes but Fed Up with Fondue by David Sax

"I’ve been in therapy for years dealing with the memory and trauma of cake."—Kirstin, Yogi/Pilates Instructor/Tastemaker

(The first of four book trailers for David Sax’s The Tastemakers, publishing 5/27/14.)